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Alkaline Trio
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Alkaline Trio Biography

In more than 25 years together, Alkaline Trio has created their own little universe in their songs, one that is a bit dark, a bit brooding, and always just a few short steps away from armageddon. Their music has been a reliable black mirror of reality. And now, as the band releases their monumental tenth album, Blood, Hair, and Eyeballs, the real world looks more like an Alkaline Trio song than ever before—midway through a global meltdown and 90 seconds to midnight on the Doomsday Clock.

 

“A lot of the stuff that was inspiring me on this record was this apocalypse culture that we live in,” says guitarist Matt Skiba. “Without sounding trite, it’s the way that we get our information now through social media. There’s always been good and there’s always been horror, but it feels like the horror hits our doorsteps much quicker these days. It gives people the feeling that things are escalating horribly.”

 

“It’s tough all around right now,” adds bassist Dan Andriano. “We can’t do drugs anymore because they’ll kill you. We can’t go anywhere safely because people are shooting places up. It’s dark and it’s a bummer.”
 
 
 

In more than 25 years together, Alkaline Trio has created their own little universe in their songs, one that is a bit dark, a bit brooding, and always just a few short steps away from armageddon. Their music has been a reliable black mirror of reality. And now, as the band releases their monumental tenth album, Blood, Hair, and Eyeballs, the real world looks more like an Alkaline Trio song than ever before—midway through a global meltdown and 90 seconds to midnight on the Doomsday Clock.

 

“A lot of the stuff that was inspiring me on this record was this apocalypse culture that we live in,” says guitarist Matt Skiba. “Without sounding trite, it’s the way that we get our information now through social media. There’s always been good and there’s always been horror, but it feels like the horror hits our doorsteps much quicker these days. It gives people the feeling that things are escalating horribly.”

 

“It’s tough all around right now,” adds bassist Dan Andriano. “We can’t do drugs anymore because they’ll kill you. We can’t go anywhere safely because people are shooting places up. It’s dark and it’s a bummer.”
 

The record also marks the end of an era for Alkaline Trio. It was the final album recorded with longtime member Derek Grant, who departed after its completion and was replaced by veteran drummer Atom Willard (Against Me!, Rocket from the Crypt). “Playing with Atom is so inspiring,” says Andriano. “His motor is unparalleled.” 

 

With more than two decades and ten records under their belts, Alkaline Trio’s legacy in the rock canon, as well as their influence on their genre, is undeniable. “I get sentimental about numbers. I’m OCD about them, in fact,” says Skiba. “To be doing this for as long as we have, and for how many times people have told me that our band has influenced them, it’s more surreal than anything. All I can do is think about it with gratitude.” Andriano is more practical about the band’s impact, looking more towards the future than the past. “I haven’t really thought about our legacy, because I don’t want it to be done,” he says. “I still feel like there’s new realms to take this. I love what we’ve built so far, but it’s yet to be seen where we end up.”

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