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Brent Cobb & Nikki Lane tickets at The Sinclair in Cambridge
Mon Aug 30, 2021 - 8:00 PM
The Sinclair, Cambridge, MA Ages: 18 & Over
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The Sinclair
52 Church St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
Mon Aug 30, 2021 - 8:00 PM
Ages: 18 & Over
Doors Open: 7:00 PM
Door Price: $29.00
Onsale: Thu Jun 17, 2021 - 10:00 AM

Please Note: This event will be presented in accordance with applicable public health requirements as of the date of the event; which could include changes to capacity, attendance prerequisites, procedures, and other protective measures.

 

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Bio: Brent Cobb

April 15th, 2019 – Grammy-nominated musician Brent Cobb has announced a new leg of the “Sucker For a Good Time Tour.” The headline dates kick off August 1st at The Windjammer in Isle of Palms, SC and continue through November, making stops at New York’s Bowery Ballroom, Chicago’s Lincoln Hall, and Macon, GA’s Hargray Capitol Theatre, among others (see attached itinerary). Artist presale tickets will be available beginning Tuesday, April 16th at 10am local time, with general onsale beginning Friday, April 19th at 10am local time. For up-to-date ticketing information, please visit www.brentcobbmusic.com.

Cobb will also continue his extensive run as part of “Chris Stapleton’s All-American Road Show” between headline dates, further celebrating the release of his critically acclaimed record, Providence Canyon, which was produced by Grammy Award-winning producer Dave Cobb. Providence Canyon is out now via Low Country Sound/Elektra Records.

Critical praise for Providence Canyon…

“One of the chief pleasures of Providence Canyon -- and it’s an album with no shortage of pleasures -- is the easiness of Cobb’s delivery. He never rushes a song, not when he lays into a thick, swampy groove, settles in for a slow tune, or evokes an outlaw country where all the cowboys would rather act as gentlemen instead of scoundrels.”—All Music

“…he epitomizes all that’s enticing about Southern rootsy singer-songwriters securing a vibe that’s organic, authentic and above all honest.”—American Songwriter

“Its scuzzy, swampy, sexy and laid back sound is straight from the 70s and wouldn’t be out of place next to a Skynyrd album.”—Austin American Statesman

“The sweet spot between big-city country and small-town Americana...with a swampy, twangy sound that eagerly dips into funk and soul while still retaining a deeply loose, deeply southern quality.”—The FADER

“The record has the goods from the excellent opening title track on down. Cobb’s got the perfect voice to suit his songs which are topped off with just enough country-rock and a dose of pedal steel to form one of the best country albums of the year.”—JamBase

“Brent Cobb has a rare depth and groove that puts him head and shoulders above most of his peers…[Providence Canyon is] full-blown country soul…one of those brilliantly timeless albums that could have been lost in someone’s dusty attic for decades. Don’t wait 30 years to find it for yourself.”—MOJO

“…Providence Canyon, with its accessible structures, sounds, and subject matter, may well enroll new listeners, Cobb gaining greater traction as a country singer-songwriter with talent, charisma, and a studious love for the genre.”—No Depression

“Nobody is more fluent in country-funk than Brent Cobb”
“Who wouldn’t want to be as comfortable in their skin as Cobb is on Providence Canyon?”
—NPR Music

“...the singer has developed a keen observational eye over the years, and a lazy, loping drawl that’s reminiscent of that style’s Grand Master, the late Roger Miller.”—Paste

“Providence Canyon, is one of the year’s best...fresh spins on timeworn country themes...with his soothing Georgia drawl enhancing the feeling.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer

“An evocative new album from one of Nashville’s maverick new singer-songwriters…”
—Rolling Stone

“Not since the days of Cledus Snow and J.J. Cale have we heard such authentic and infectious country soul scratched into vinyl.” —Saving Country Music

“Singing with a country twang but rocking in the spirit of the Allmans and Skynyrd…Cobb also adds a dash of Jerry Reed, taking his music in a deliciously funky direction.”—UPROXX

“Like your favorite novel, Providence Canyon grows more familiar and compelling each time you revisit it…a masterful southern opus…with Providence Canyon, Brent Cobb has created a place you’ll want to revisit again and again.”—Wide Open Country

Last year, Cobb performed “Ain’t A Road Too Long” on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”, plus “High In The Country” as a web exclusive – both from his new record. The album and tour follow a breakthrough few years for Cobb, who was nominated for Best Americana Album at the 60th GRAMMY Awards for his major label debut, Shine On Rainy Day. Since the album’s release, Cobb was also nominated for Emerging Artist of the Year at the 2017 Americana Honors & Awards and made his television debut on CONAN.

Cobb was born in Americus, Georgia, about an hour east of Columbus, in the rural south-central part of the state. In addition to his work as an artist, Cobb is widely respected as a songwriter garnering cuts by Lee Ann Womack, Luke Bryan, The Oak Ridge Boys, Little Big Town, Miranda Lambert and more.

Bio: Nikki Lane

Nikki Lane’s stunning third album Highway Queen, out February 17th, 2017, sees the young Nashville singer emerge as one of country and rock’s most gifted songwriters. Co-produced by Lane and fellow singer-songwriter, Jonathan Tyler, this emotional tour-de-force was recorded at Matt Pence’s Echo Lab studio in Denton, Texas as well as at Club Roar with Collin Dupuis in Nashville, Tennessee. Blending potent lyrics, unbridled blues guitars and vintage Sixties country-pop swagger, Lane’s new music will resonate as easily with Lana Del Rey and Jenny Lewis fans as those of Neil Young and Tom Petty. 

Highway Queen is a journey through heartbreak that takes exquisite turns. The record begins with a whiskey-soaked homage to Lane’s hometown (“700,000 Rednecks”) and ends on the profoundly raw “Forever Lasts Forever,” where Lane mourns a failed marriage – the “lighter shade of skin” left behind from her wedding ring. On “Forever” and the confessional “Muddy Waters,” Lane’s lyrics align her with perceptive songwriters like Nick Lowe and Cass McCombs. Elsewhere, “Companion” is pure Everly Brothers’ dreaminess (“I would spend a lifetime/ Playing catch you if I can”). She goes on a Vegas bender on the rollicking “Jackpot,” fights last-call blues (“Foolish Heart”) and tosses off brazen one-liners at a backroom piano (“Big Mouth”).

“Love is the most unavoidable thing in the world,” Lane says. “The person you pick could be half set-up to destroy your life with their own habits – I’ve certainly experienced that before and taken way too long to get out of that mistake.” 

In 2014, Lane’s second album All or Nothin’ (New West) solidified her sandpaper voice beneath a ten-gallon hat as the new sound and look of outlaw country music. Produced by Dan Auerbach, the record’s bluesy Western guitars paired with Lane’s Dusty Springfield-esque voice earned glowing reviews from NPR, the Guardian and Rolling Stone. In three years since her Walk of Shame debut, Lane said she was living most of the year on the road.

Growing up, Lane used to watch her father pave asphalt during blistering South Carolina summers. She’d sit on the roller (“what helps smooth out the asphalt”) next to a guy named Rooster and divvy out Hardee’s lunch orders for the workers. “My father thought he was a country singer,” Lane laughs. “He partied hard at night, but by 6:30 AM he was out on the roads in 100-degree weather.” That’s the southern work ethic, she says. “We didn’t have a lot of money, but I was privileged with the knowledge of how to work hard, how to learn and to succeed when things aren’t set up for me.” Creativity was an unthinkable luxury, she adds. “When people told me I should try to get a record deal for songs I was writing, I was like, ‘that’s cute – I’ve got to be at work at 10 A.M.’” 

“Becoming a songwriter is one of the most selfish things I’ve ever done,” Lane says plainly. She describes writing her first song at age 25 like it was a necessary act of self-preservation after a devastating breakup. Many of her early songs, she said on Shame and Nothin’, were about the fleetingness of relationships she believed were permanent, she says. Lane’s main line of work in those days was a fashion entrepreneur (she’s currently the owner of Nashville’s vintage clothing boutique High Class Hillbilly). It brought her to cities around the country, New York to Los Angeles to Nashville. And like a true wanderer, Lane’s sound crisscrosses musical genres with ease, while the lonesome romantic in her remains. Even a soft song like, “Send The Sun,” with its lilting downward strum, is flush with bittersweet emotion. “Darling, we’re staring at the same moon,” Lane sings lovingly. “I used to say that to my ex,” she says with cheerful stoicism, “to try to brighten the long nights, stay positive.”

Highway Queen is poised to be Lane’s mainstream breakthrough. “Am I excited to spend years of my life in a van, away from family and friends? No, but I’m excited to share my songs, so they’ll reach people and help them get through whatever they’re going through. To me, that’s worth it.” 

“Lay You Down” is one of those unexpected moments for Lane. “That song was inspired by something Levon Helm’s wife posted on Facebook when he was sick with cancer,” Lane says. “I was just so moved by her telling the world how much love he felt from people writing to them, and moved that because of the Internet, I was able to see that love ­– even from a distance.” The song became surreal for Lane and her band when her longtime guitarist, Alex Munoz, was diagnosed with cancer while they were playing it. “It deepened my perspective and the importance of keeping everyone safe,” says Lane.

On the record cover, Lane looks out on wide, unowned Texan plains, leaning on the fearsome horns of a massive steer. Wearing a vintage Victorian dress, the stark photo invokes a time before highways existed. The symbolism isn’t lost on Lane. Highway Queen was a pioneering moment for her as an artist.

“I was always a smart girl, always had to yell to be heard,” she says, “But this was the first time in my career where I decided how things were going to go; I was willing to take the heat.” Lane included the bonus track “Champion” as a small testament to that empowerment. “It makes a point,” Lane says with a smile, “That I appreciate what you’re saying, but get the fuck out of my way.” 

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