Event Info
RJD2 & Tortoise tickets at The Showbox in Seattle
Apr
21
Fri

Showbox Presents:

RJD2 & Tortoise

with 1939 Ensemble
The Showbox Seattle, WA - 8:00 PM Ages: All Ages to Enter, 21 & Over to Drink

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Showbox Presents:

Showbox Presents:

RJD2 & Tortoise

with 1939 Ensemble
The Showbox
1426 1st Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 628-3151
Fri, Apr 21, 2017 - 8:00PM
Ages: All Ages to Enter, 21 & Over to Drink
Doors Open: 7:00 PM
Onsale: Tue, Mar 7, 2017 - 10:00AM PDT
Guests 21 and over can join us in the Kerns Music Lounge (adjacent to our main lobby) 2 hours prior to scheduled door time for food, drinks and priority entry into the showroom.

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Bio: RJD2

Dame Fortune is the deliciously eclectic sixth album from veteran producer and crate digger extraordinaire RJD2, out March 25th on RJ’s Electrical Connections. It’s a wondrous beast, recorded over the past year while living in Philadelphia, before returning to his hometown of Columbus, Ohio. Streaked with Philly’s rep for deeply felt soul music while maintaining a playful sense of adventurousness, Dame Fortune features guest vocalists Son Little (aka Aaron Livingston) and frequent collaborator Phonte, while also presenting the bombastic hip-hop sound that marked RJD2’s breakthrough album, Deadringer, and even an orchestral composition for the societal unrest experienced in this day and age (called “PF Day One”…the PF standing for “Post Ferguson”).

“Living in Philly provided a context for a lot of soul music that I had liked,” RJD2 says on the city’s influence on Dame Fortune’s sound. “I didn’t have any cultural context for this music that I liked—it was just music that I had stumbled across as a beat making nerd. Philly was a place where there were enough people who had the same musical vocabulary that I did, which made the music more than something I had just discovered on my own.”

The debut single, “Peace of What,” features Jordan Brown and draws inspiration from 1990s rap legends Main Source’s 1991 single “Peace Is Not the Word to Play.” “When I hear people talk of peace in America, the discrepancy between our words and our actions can get fatiguing,” he says on the inspiration behind the song. “I was trying to reflect the experience of people I know, which often feels like ‘We’re not ACTUALLY trying to do anything about this problem in our country.’”

Thought-provoking and undeniably entertaining all at once, this latest exhibition of musical virtuosity is a crystal-clear reflection of RJD2’s cinematic aspirations, reminding listeners that it’s always rewarding to expect the unexpected. RJD2 will tour throughout 2016 in support of Dame Fortune and his 20-year-plus-career.

---

Simply put, Tortoise has spent nearly 25 years making music that defies description. While the Chicago-based instrumental quintet has nodded to dub, rock, jazz, electronica and minimalism throughout its revered and influential six-album discography, the resulting sounds have always been distinctly, even stubbornly, their own.

It's a fact that remains true on "The Catastrophist," Tortoise's first studio album in nearly seven years. And it's an album where moody, synth-swept jams like the opening title track cozy up next to hypnotic, bass-and-beat missives like "Shake Hands With Danger" and a downright strange cover of David Essex's 1973 radio smash sung by U.S. Maple's Todd Rittmann. Throughout, the songs transcend expectations as often as they delight the eardrums.

Tortoise, comprised of multi-instrumentalists Dan Bitney, John Herndon, Doug McCombs, John McEntire and Jeff Parker, has always thrived on sudden bursts of inspiration. And for "The Catastrophist," the spark came in 2010 when the group was commissioned by the City of Chicago to compose a suite of music rooted in its ties to the area's noted jazz and improvised music communities.

Tortoise then performed those five loose themes at a handful of concerts, and "when we finally got around to talking about a new record, the obvious solution to begin with was to take those pieces and see what else we could do with them," says McEntire, at whose Soma Studios the band recorded the new album. "It turned out that for them to work for Tortoise, they needed a bit more of a rethink in terms of structure. They're all pretty different in the sense that at first they were just heads and solos. Now, they're orchestrated and complex."

"All of the songs went through a pretty intensive process of restructuring," adds Parker. "We actually had quite a lot of material that we ended up giving up on. Oftentimes, we'll shelve ideas and come back to them years later."

The album's single "Gesceap" embodies the transformation of the original suite commissions, as it morphs from two gently intersecting synth lines into a pounding, frenzied full-band finish. "To a certain extent it's more of a reflection of how we actually sound when we play live," says McEntire of Tortoise's heavier side. "That hasn't always been captured as well on past albums."

Elsewhere, "Hot Coffee" resurrects an idea abandoned from the band's 2004 album "It's All Around You," gliding through only-on-aTortoise-album sections of funktastic bass lines, straight-up dance beats and Parker's fusion-flecked guitar bursts. "It's progressive experimental music with pop sensibilities," says Parker.

"Rock On," which McEntire says he and McCombs simultaneously had the idea to cover after having remembered hearing it on the radio all the time as kids, isn't the only vocal moment on "The Catastrophist." Also included is the bittersweet, honest-to-goodness soul ballad "Yonder Blue," sung by Yo La Tengo's Georgia Hubley. "We'd finished the track and decided it would be good to have vocals on it," recalls McEntire. "Robert Wyatt was our first choice, but he had just retired and politely said no. We were discussing asking Georgia to do something, but not that track in particular. Then we realized it would totally work."

Tortoise is planning an extensive world tour in support of "The Catastrophist." Admits McEntire, "figuring out how to reproduce these songs live will be a bit of a challenge. But I also feel like it might be time to dip into the back catalog a bit. The pool we draw from has been really consistent for quite awhile.

As ever, Tortoise has conjured sounds on "The Catastrophist" that aren't being purveyed anywhere else in music today. There's a deeply intuitive interplay between the group members that comes only from two decades of experimentation, revision and improvisation. And at a time when our brains are constantly bombarded by myriad distractions, "The Catastrophist" reminds us that there's something much greater out there. All we have to do is listen.

Bio: Tortoise

Simply put, Tortoise has spent nearly 25 years making music that defies description. While the Chicago-based instrumental quintet has nodded to dub, rock, jazz, electronica and minimalism throughout its revered and influential six-album discography, the resulting sounds have always been distinctly, even stubbornly, their own.

It’s a fact that remains true on “The Catastrophist,” Tortoise’s first studio album in nearly seven years. And it’s an album where moody, synth-swept jams like the opening title track cozy up next to hypnotic, bass-and-beat missives like “Shake Hands With Danger” and a downright strange cover of David Essex’s 1973 radio smash sung by U.S. Maple’s Todd Rittmann. Throughout, the songs transcend expectations as often as they delight the eardrums.

Tortoise, comprised of multi-instrumentalists Dan Bitney, John Herndon, Doug McCombs, John McEntire and Jeff Parker, has always thrived on sudden bursts of inspiration. And for “The Catastrophist,” the spark came in 2010 when the group was commissioned by the City of Chicago to compose a suite of music rooted in its ties to the area’s noted jazz and improvised music communities.

Tortoise then performed those five loose themes at a handful of concerts, and “when we finally got around to talking about a new record, the obvious solution to begin with was to take those pieces and see what else we could do with them,” says McEntire, at whose Soma Studios the band recorded the new album. “It turned out that for them to work for Tortoise, they needed a bit more of a rethink in terms of structure. They’re all pretty different in the sense that at first they were just heads and solos. Now, they’re orchestrated and complex.”

“All of the songs went through a pretty intensive process of restructuring,” adds Parker. “We actually had quite a lot of material that we ended up giving up on. Oftentimes, we’ll shelve ideas and come back to them years later.”

The album’s single “Gesceap” embodies the transformation of the original suite commissions, as it morphs from two gently intersecting synth lines into a pounding, frenzied full-band finish. “To a certain extent it’s more of a reflection of how we actually sound when we play live,” says McEntire of Tortoise’s heavier side. “That hasn’t always been captured as well on past albums.”

Elsewhere, “Hot Coffee” resurrects an idea abandoned from the band’s 2004 album “It’s All Around You,” gliding through only-on-aTortoise-album sections of funktastic bass lines, straight-up dance beats and Parker’s fusion-flecked guitar bursts. “It’s progressive experimental music with pop sensibilities,” says Parker.

“Rock On,” which McEntire says he and McCombs simultaneously had the idea to cover after having remembered hearing it on the radio all the time as kids, isn’t the only vocal moment on “The Catastrophist.” Also included is the bittersweet, honest-to-goodness soul ballad “Yonder Blue,” sung by Yo La Tengo’s Georgia Hubley. “We’d finished the track and decided it would be good to have vocals on it,” recalls McEntire. “Robert Wyatt was our first choice, but he had just retired and politely said no. We were discussing asking Georgia to do something, but not that track in particular. Then we realized it would totally work.”

Tortoise is planning an extensive world tour in support of “The Catastrophist.” Admits McEntire, “figuring out how to reproduce these songs live will be a bit of a challenge. But I also feel like it might be time to dip into the back catalog a bit. The pool we draw from has been really consistent for quite awhile.

As ever, Tortoise has conjured sounds on “The Catastrophist” that aren’t being purveyed anywhere else in music today. There’s a deeply intuitive interplay between the group members that comes only from two decades of experimentation, revision and improvisation. And at a time when our brains are constantly bombarded by myriad distractions, “The Catastrophist” reminds us that there’s something much greater out there. All we have to do is listen.

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