Celebrate Louisiana culture at Jazz Fest’s Folklife Village

Leah D. Nelson - AXS Contributor
By: AXS Contributor Apr 27, 2014
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The culture and history of Louisiana is rich and diverse, and that heritage is celebrated in the Louisiana Folklife Village enclave at the 2014 Jazz Fest. Located near the Fais Do-Do Stage, the village is full of artisans, crafters and tradespeople from throughout the state. Here’s a list of some of the Village’s highlights for Jazz Fest attendees who want to learn more about the Pelican State and experience its history.

  • 4.Louisiana Bonsai
    Bonsais aren’t just found in Asia. The humidity and overall wet climate in Louisiana means that plants thrive. Locals are proud of their yar
    Leah Nelson

    Bonsais aren’t just found in Asia. The humidity and overall wet climate in Louisiana means that plants thrive. Locals are proud of their yards and show off that pride with impeccable landscaping, and Guy Guidry is part of that tradition. Guidry leads bonsai classes out of Nola Bonsai on Jackson Avenue, and he brought some beautiful specimens with him to the Jazz Fest. Stop by the Waterways of Louisiana tent and ask about his techniques, his love of bonsai art and how to register for classes.  

  • 3.Waterways of Louisiana
    Located on one of the busiest waterways in the world, New Orleans has made the Mississippi River part of its heritage, commerce and liveliho
    Leah Nelson

    Located on one of the busiest waterways in the world, New Orleans has made the Mississippi River part of its heritage, commerce and livelihood. From riverboat tours to cargo ships and fishing boats, river vessels play an integral part in Louisiana life. In the Waterways tent, Tom Colvin demonstrates traditional boat building, and Kernis Huval shows attendees the importance of a taut and well-made net when catching crawfish. The Robin family of St. Bernard Parish will help visitors choose an authentic miniature boat to take home, making for a unique Jazz Fest souvenir.

  • 2.United Houma Nation
    While the state may be more well known for its Creole, French and Spanish influences, the Houma people are Louisiana’s original natives. The
    Leah Nelson

    While the state may be more well known for its Creole, French and Spanish influences, the Houma people are Louisiana’s original natives. The tribe is out in full force throughout the Village. Sample delicious sausage or shrimp macque choux complemented with traditional Indian fry bread, or try a spicy Indian taco. Stick around for a Pow-Wow, where United Houma Nation dancers in full tribal regalia demonstrate traditional dances, and head over to the Native Nations tent for pine needle basket and wood carving demonstrations.

  • 1.Traditional Ironwork
    It may be hot outside at the Jazz Fest, but Darryl Reeves is hotter. The tradesman from Andrew's Welding & Blacksmith shows audience members
    Leah Nelson

    It may be hot outside at the Jazz Fest, but Darryl Reeves is hotter. The tradesman from Andrew's Welding & Blacksmith shows audience members how he creates some of the beautiful and distinctive iron adornments New Orleans architecture is renowned for. From heating up the iron over a raging coal fire to shaping it into a leaf or a Fleur de Lis, Reeves knows his stuff and is happy to share his knowledge.

    Read more on the all-AXS Jazz Fest Guide

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